Reading Wednesday | Shelter of the Most High

Shelter of the Most High, by Connilyn Cossette, is a captivating tale set in 1388 BC. Sofea is a young woman taken from her home on the Island of Sicily. She is eventually brought to Kedesh, a City of Refuge among the Hebrews. Eitan is a young man who wishes to leave Kedesh, but cannot under the risk of death. Together, these two must unravel betrayal before those closest to them pay the price.

In the early days after the Israelites fled Egypt, they set up a collection of towns called Cities of Refuge. These are safe harbors for people who are considered manslayers, or those who caused the accidental death of another. As long as the manslayer remains in the City of Refuge, the victim’s family cannot avenge their loved one’s death by killing the manslayer. 20181001_110907

Eitan was a child when he and his mother were forced to take refuge in Kedesh after the death of two young children. The young boys’ father is determined to revenge his sons’ death by killing Eitan and his mother for their part in the boys’ death. But as long as Eitan stays within Kadesh’s walls, he is safe.

Sofea’s story begins with great tragedy. Readers see this in the first chapters of the book and it is difficult to read. Once Sofea arrives in Kadesh, however, it is beautiful to watch the city’s influence on her. The author does a fantastic job of slowly telling her story, showing Kadesh through her foreign eyes.

Shelter of the Most High is the second book in the Cities of Refuge series. Having not read Book One first, I did not feel like I was missing anything by starting with Book Two. Connilyn Cossette has a beautiful writing style and the story itself unfolded to reveal such great love and mercy. I definitely recommend reading Shelter of the Most High.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Bethany House Publishers in order to provide an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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