Reading Wednesday | End Game

An FBI agent and an NCIS agent team up to solve the murder of a Navy SEAL in End Game. It’s the first book in Rachel Dylan’s new Capital Intrigue series. Will they discover who is behind the mounting casualty list before they become a victim, too?

The FBI is called into investigate when a murder MO is eerily similar to on that had happened a few days prior. Worried they have a serial killer on their hands, she aims to solve this case, but runs into a complication when NCIS Special Agent Marco Agostini takes over the investigation.

As Marco and Bailey work together to solve the case, they also form feelings for one another. However, these two are not the only ones with relationship struggles. So does the JAG lawyer and local prosecutor. Even Marco’s partner has a difficult backstory. All these threads added drama to the story, but I kept waiting for them to be relevant to the plot line.

Overall, End Game was a good story. The murder investigation kept me guessing. The character development, however, was on the shallow side. I would have loved to feel more invested in just one of the couples instead spread between three. There was also a lot of telling, so while the story was good, it felt more like it was told to me instead of me as the reader experiencing it.

One aspect I liked was the the legal perspective. As a lawyer herself, Rachel Dylan was able to add a depth to Bailey’s character and the investigation that I enjoyed. Bailey also had a good group of friends who I hope we’ll see more of in the rest of the series.

If you’re looking for a good story, try End Game. I wanted to like it more than I did, especially because I enjoyed the last book I read by Rachel Dylan. But perhaps you will enjoy it more than me.

I received this book free from Bethany House Publishers in order to provide an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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